Poll

Does wearing clothes reduce our vitamin D levels?

Yes, Most definatley.
1 (50%)
No.
1 (50%)
Other.
0 (0%)

Total Members Voted: 2

Author Topic: Does wearing clothes reduce our vitamin D levels?  (Read 854 times)

357

  • Truth Seeker
  • ***
  • Posts: 680
Does wearing clothes reduce our vitamin D levels?
« on: April 22, 2015, 02:48:47 PM »
Vitamin D – Could It Stop 'Modern’ Diseases And Allergy?

An award-winning writer and scientist believes a deficiency of Vitamin D in pregnant women is behind the increase in conditions such as MS, diabetes, schizophrenia and asthma

Other studies have shown negative effects on fetal brain development during the third trimester of pregnancy related to vitamin D deficiency, including increased risk of schizophrenia and language problems. Also, a higher risk of autism in springtime births has been reported in several studies.

Incidence of Gestational Vitamin D Deficiency

Dr. Joyce Lee and her colleagues at the University of Michigan studied 40 pregnant women, the majority taking prenatal vitamins. Only two had blood levels >50 ng/mL and only three had levels >40 ng/mL. That is, 37 of 40 pregnant women had levels below 40 ng/mL, and the majority had levels below 20 ng/mL. More than 25% had levels below 10 ng/mL.1

Dr. Lisa Bodnar, a prolific Vitamin D researcher, and her colleagues at the University of Pittsburg studied 400 pregnant Pennsylvania women; 63% had levels below 30 ng/mL and 44% of the black women in the study had levels below 15 ng/mL. Prenatal vitamins had little effect on the incidence of deficiency.2

Dr. Dijkstra and colleagues studied 70 pregnant women in the Netherlands, none had levels above 40 ng/mL and 50% had levels below 10 ng/mL. Again, prenatal vitamins appeared to have little effect on 25(OH)D levels, as you might expect since prenatal vitamins only contain 400 IU of Vitamin D.3

Thus, more than 95% of pregnant women have 25(OH)D levels below 50 ng/mL, the level that may indicate chronic substrate starvation. That is, they are using up any Vitamin D they have very quickly and do not have enough to store for future use. Pretty scary.

Effects on the Mother

Caesarean section
Preeclampsia
Gestational Diabetes
Bacterial Vaginitis

Effects on the child

Schizophrenia
Mental Retardation
Newborn Lower Respiratory Tract Infection
Birth weight
Diabetes
Seizures
Heart Failure
Weak bones
Brain Tumors
Epilepsy
Craniotabes
Cavities
Asthma

The announcement simply pointed out that the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recently recommended that all pregnant women have a 25(OH)D blood test because Vitamin D is important for normal fetal development (p. 1145):
“Given the growing evidence that adequate maternal vitamin D status is essential during pregnancy, not only for maternal well-being but also for fetal development, health care professionals who provide obstetric care should consider assessing maternal vitamin D status by measuring the 25-OH-D concentrations of pregnant women. On an individual basis, a mother should be supplemented with adequate amounts of vitamin D3 to ensure that her 25-OH-D levels are in a sufficient range (>32 ng/mL). The knowledge that prenatal vitamins containing 400 IU of vitamin D3 have little effect on circulating maternal 25-OH-D concentrations, especially during the winter months, should be imparted to all health care professionals

What can you do?

Most people want to do good—at least some good—in their lives. The endless pursuit of the Godalmighty dollar, better clothes, better houses and better vacations than your neighbors eventually leaves a hole in your soul. Here is an opportunity to fill it.
If you don’t feel that soul hole, try a meditation I learned at Esalen Institute in the 1980s and have practiced ever since. Lie on the floor and pretend you are dead in your grave. Feel the worms, smell the rot, sense the finality. Then, when you really feel dead, visualize your gravestone above. What does it say? “Here lies Robert; he had a big fancy house.” “Here lies Vanessa; she wore beautiful clothes and had four face lifts.” Here lies Michael; he made a billion dollars.” Through this meditation, I realized I want my gravestone to say, “Here lies John, he did something good.”
One good thing you can do is simply tell every pregnant woman and women thinking of getting pregnant that she needs to take more Vitamin D, a lot more. Pregnant women need a minimum of 5,000 IU per day and even that dose will not achieve 25(OH)D levels of >50 ng/mL in all women. Why not buy a few bottles of 5,000 IU capsules and hand out the bottles to your pregnant friends? You can get 250 vitamin D capsules for 15 bucks. Or, forward this email to them. Show them our Pregnancy and Vitamin D public service announcement.

If you want to do more, why not get a copy of our Pregnancy and Vitamin D public service
announcement by emailing our webmaster at webmaster@vitamindcouncil.org (the ad is not copyrighted) and then pay to run it on a TV station in your hometown? You can easily add a caption at the bottom saying this public service announcement is being sponsored by your company, combining a good deed with good business.
Alas, no glory will be yours, at least in this life. No woman will ever thank you for the schizophrenic child she never had, for the trips to the emergency room with a breathless child that she never made, for the repetitive moaning of the autistic child she never endured. Although, she may wonder why her pregnancy was so easy and why her infant is so healthy, alert, active, and smart.

Vitamin D in your pregnancy diet

Reviewed by the BabyCenter Medical Advisory Board

Why you need vitamin D during pregnancy

Your body needs vitamin D to maintain proper levels of calcium andphosphorus, which help build your baby's bones and teeth. A vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy can cause growth retardation and skeletal deformities. It may also have an impact on birth weight.
If you're lacking vitamin D during pregnancy, your baby may be short on the vitamin at birth. This can put her at risk for rickets (which can lead to fractures and deformity), abnormal bone growth, and delayed physical development. And the results can be long lasting: Researchers believe that a vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy can affect bone development and immune function from birth through adulthood.

A deficiency of vitamin D has also been linked to a greater risk of pregnancy complications, including preeclampsia, and a higher likelihood of an expectant mom needing a c-section.
Vitamin D has been the topic of much research in recent years. Researchers are studying vitamin D's role in preventing a number of diseases. These include certain autoimmune diseases (type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis), osteoarthritis, cancers (especially colon cancer), gum disease, and high blood pressure.
How much vitamin D you need

The National Academy of Sciences currently recommends that pregnant women get 200 IUs (5 micrograms) of vitamin D each day if they're not exposed to adequate sunlight (your body makes vitamin D when exposed to the sun). Many experts believe this amount isn't nearly enough. And the National Academy of Sciences is reviewing its guidelines on vitamin D, so they may change.
"I recommend that pregnant women take a supplement of 4,000 IU of vitamin D a day. And I recommend that lactating women take a supplement of 6,000 IU daily," says Bruce Hollis, professor of pediatrics at the Medical University of South Carolina, who has researched vitamin D needs.

Food sources of vitamin D

Fish liver oil, fatty fish, and fortified milk, egg, and cereal products all contain vitamin D. Be sure to check food labels: Some eggs, cheeses, yogurts, and cereals are fortified while others aren't. All milk is vitamin D fortified.
Here are some of the best food sources of vitamin D:
•   3 ounces catfish, cooked: 570 IU
•   3.5 ounces salmon, cooked: 360 IU
•   3.5 ounces mackerel, cooked: 345 IU
•   3 ounces tuna fish, canned in oil: 200 IU
•   1.75 ounces sardines, canned in oil, drained: 250 IU
•   1 cup milk, fortified with 25% of daily value (DV) of vitamin D: 100 IU
•   1 cup orange juice, fortified with 25% of DV of vitamin D: 100 IU
•   1 cup fortified skim milk: 98 IU
•   1 tablespoon margarine, fortified: 60 IU
•   1 cup ready-to-eat cereal, fortified with 10% of DV of vitamin D: 40 IU
•   1 egg yolk: 20 IU

Vitamin D Deficiency May Be The Cause Of Allergies And Autism.

Rates of autism were 40% higher in African Americans living in states
Further, African Americans had approximately 40% lower levels of vitamin D than white Americans.

Black Americans have lower vitamin D concentrations due to their darker skin and since solar UVB is the main source of vitamin D for most Americans.

This finding leads to the question of whether the disorder is due to the mother’s vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy or a vitamin D deficiency in early life or both.

Other studies have shown negative effects on fetal brain development during the third trimester of pregnancy related to vitamin D deficiency, including increased risk of schizophrenia and language problems. Also, a higher risk of autism in springtime births has been reported in several studies.

One of the ways in which vitamin D might reduce the risk of autism during pregnancy is by lowering the risk of sporadic DNA mutations from influencing fetal development. Another is through reducing the risk of influenza and other infectious diseases during pregnancy, which have been linked to increased risk of schizophrenia. Vitamin D also reduces inflammation.

In early life, vitamin D might reduce the risk of autism by strengthening the body’s immune system and reducing inflammation.
Several other recent studies have shown that vitamin D deficiency is common among autistic children.  Once the disorder has developed, symptoms may be reduced by treating the deficiency in autistic children, although this remains to be shown in randomized controlled trials.

The study is published online in the peer-reviewed journalDermato-Endocrinology.
Source: Dermato-Endocrinology