Author Topic: Zul-Kifl  (Read 2289 times)

Ibrahim-Khalil

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Zul-Kifl
« on: October 10, 2009, 10:29:25 PM »
Peace, all. I think that every statement in the Quran has a purpose. What purpose in mentioning Zul-Kifl? Just want to know you opinions.

Ahmad Bilal

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Re: Zul-Kifl
« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2009, 01:27:27 AM »
Peace,

I think the purpose of mentioning "Zul Kifl" in the scripture is to illustrate the idea that God's messengers come from ALL nations and people, not just the Jews. That's why many Muslims today identify "Zul Kifl" as Buddha, who preached a message of peace and hope for his people in India.
"The true delight is in the finding out, rather than in the knowing." - Isaac Asimov

Alen

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Re: Zul-Kifl
« Reply #2 on: October 11, 2009, 02:55:18 AM »
Peace,
Respectfully.

Not to cause a glitch in the matrix but not everything in The Quran is meant for the year 2009 and The West.
The Quran is one Extra-Ordinary Book and goes for the time it was compiled to the Last Day. God knows best. It works/functions for all humans/places/situations.

Thank God,
Hvala Bogu,
AlhamdilAllah.

Glory be to God,
Glory be to The MOST Merciful.
As salamu alaykum.
39:53 Say: O My servants who transgressed against themselves, do not despair of God\'s mercy. For God forgives all sins. He is the Forgiver, the Merciful.

Ibrahim-Khalil

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Re: Zul-Kifl
« Reply #3 on: October 11, 2009, 03:22:52 AM »
Salam Ahmad, whats up with you studing?

Yeah, i heard opinion about Zul-Kifl being a Buddha. Also read that he may be Ezekiel from OT. But these r conjectures, u know.

"Zul-Kifl"

Kaf-Fa-Lam = To take care of, nourish, bring up for another, be guardian of, be responsible for, entrust, stand security or surety.

kafala vb. (1)
impf. act. 3:44, 20:40, 28:12

kafil n.m. 16:91

kifl n.m. 4:85, 57:28

dhu al-kifl n. 21:85, 38:48

kaffala vb. (2) perf. act. 3:37

akfala vb. (4) impv. 38:23

LL, V8, p: 255

---

studyquran.org

It would be interesting to hear people like idolfree (GodWithin now, like i know), TheNabi, Wakas and all the other users :)

Waalaykum Assalam, Alen. U r right, but what about my question, brother? :)

Ahmad Bilal

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Re: Zul-Kifl
« Reply #4 on: October 11, 2009, 10:20:30 AM »
Salaam Ibrahim-Khalil,

Yeah, i heard opinion about Zul-Kifl being a Buddha. Also read that he may be Ezekiel from OT. But these r conjectures, u know.

This is true, and we don't specifically know for sure. However, "Zul Kifl" (or "Dhul Kifl") doesn't bear any resemblence to Ezekiel, other than the idea that they both end with the letter "L"... It ties in, though, with the story of Buddha. The word "dhu" means belonging to or possessing, and "kifl" is often regarded as the Arabic transliteration of "Kipl", the place where Siddhartha Guatama, the "Buddha", was born. Coincidentally, he preached a message of peace ("al islaam"?), and he often spoke of the "middle path" ("siraatul mustaqiym"?). The Qur'aanic mention of him in Q. 21:85-86 mentions him among the "patient ones", which is one of the main doctrines that Buddha taught to his people...

Just a thought.

Peace,

Ahmad
"The true delight is in the finding out, rather than in the knowing." - Isaac Asimov

Ibrahim-Khalil

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Re: Zul-Kifl
« Reply #5 on: October 11, 2009, 12:55:50 PM »
thanks, Ahmad, that was interesting.

"and "kifl" is often regarded as the Arabic transliteration of "Kipl".

Can u tell me a lil bit more about this, or, maybe some links.

Ahmad Bilal

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Re: Zul-Kifl
« Reply #6 on: October 11, 2009, 04:45:23 PM »
"and "kifl" is often regarded as the Arabic transliteration of "Kipl".

Can u tell me a lil bit more about this, or, maybe some links.

Sure... Maulana Manazir Ahsan Gilani, a famous Deobandi Islaamic scholar, agreed with the proposed argument that Buddha was a prophet (or at least messenger) of Allah, and many of his teachings were similar to Islaamic principles. In fact, there were already others who were proposing the idea that Jesus was a "buddha", and he actually taught many of his teachings to the Indian Buddhists, especially concerning peace, harmony, piety, and poverty... Siddhartha Guatama was born in a place called Kapil-Avastu, which is often shortened to "Kapil". Since Arabic doesn't have the letter "P" in it's alphabet, many Islaamic scholars are suggesting that it is replaced with an "F", making the Arabic transliteration of "Kapil" (or Kipl) to be "Kifl". Therefore, the meaning of "Dhul-Kifl" would be "the one from/belonging to Kipl"... These same ideas were proposed by Naziri and Maulana Abul Kalam Azad, who I think was the first to openly suggest it...

This gives the BASIC basics of that concept...  :)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dhul-Kifl

It's very unlikely that "Dhul-Kifl" is referring to Ezekiel. Ezekiel is an anglicized version of the Hebrew name "Yechezqial", which is "Heziqiyal" in Arabic. It would, however, apply to Buddha. Even if we take the most common meaning of "dhul" (possessor of), this could still apply to Buddha, since his father is said to have been the ruler of the land of Kapil, making Siddhartha Guatama the ruling prince of that area. Also, the concept of substituting the "P" for the "F" is not unusual either, since this is often the case with Arabic names like "Palestine" and "Persia", which are given a "Fa" instead of a "P". The same could easily be applied to Kapil (or Kipl), turning "Kipl" into "Kifl"...
"The true delight is in the finding out, rather than in the knowing." - Isaac Asimov

MUNZIR ALI

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Re: Zul-Kifl
« Reply #7 on: October 11, 2009, 07:59:03 PM »
Sure... Maulana Manazir Ahsan Gilani, a famous Deobandi Islaamic scholar, agreed with the proposed argument that Buddha was a prophet (or at least messenger) of Allah, and many of his teachings were similar to Islaamic principles. In fact, there were already others who were proposing the idea that Jesus was a "buddha", and he actually taught many of his teachings to the Indian Buddhists, especially concerning peace, harmony, piety, and poverty... Siddhartha Guatama was born in a place called Kapil-Avastu, which is often shortened to "Kapil". Since Arabic doesn't have the letter "P" in it's alphabet, many Islaamic scholars are suggesting that it is replaced with an "F", making the Arabic transliteration of "Kapil" (or Kipl) to be "Kifl". Therefore, the meaning of "Dhul-Kifl" would be "the one from/belonging to Kipl"... These same ideas were proposed by Naziri and Maulana Abul Kalam Azad, who I think was the first to openly suggest it...

This gives the BASIC basics of that concept...  :)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dhul-Kifl

It's very unlikely that "Dhul-Kifl" is referring to Ezekiel. Ezekiel is an anglicized version of the Hebrew name "Yechezqial", which is "Heziqiyal" in Arabic. It would, however, apply to Buddha. Even if we take the most common meaning of "dhul" (possessor of), this could still apply to Buddha, since his father is said to have been the ruler of the land of Kapil, making Siddhartha Guatama the ruling prince of that area. Also, the concept of substituting the "P" for the "F" is not unusual either, since this is often the case with Arabic names like "Palestine" and "Persia", which are given a "Fa" instead of a "P". The same could easily be applied to Kapil (or Kipl), turning "Kipl" into "Kifl"...
:bravo: Thanks for the information.

afridi220

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Re: Zul-Kifl
« Reply #8 on: October 12, 2009, 05:11:21 AM »
:bravo: Thanks for the information.

If the informations are 100 % correct from where did Mr. mullana got these informations.
Peace


People are often unreasonable, illogical and self-centered; forgive them anyway

Ahmad Bilal

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Re: Zul-Kifl
« Reply #9 on: October 12, 2009, 07:50:18 AM »
If the informations are 100 % correct from where did Mr. mullana got these informations.

Maulana Abul Kalam Azad first suggested this idea when debating with some Islaamic scholars regarding the prophethood of "Dhul-Kifl". They claimed that he was the Biblical prophet "Ezekiel", mentioned in the Tanakh among the Jewish prophets, even saying that his tomb still lies in Iraq in a city called "Kefil". Perhaps this is true... However, Maulana Abul Kalam Azad wrote in his Qur'aanic commentary ("Tarjiman ul Qur'aan") that he believed it to refer to Buddha, since the scripture clearly mentions that prophets and messengers were sent to EVERY nation on the earth, not just to the Jews. He suggested that "Kifl" may be the Arabic transliteration of "Kipl", especially since the Arabic language doesn't have a "P", and in titles relating to this, the "P" is often replaced with a "B" or an "F", since these are the closest in pronounciation.

Even if "Dhul-Kifl" isn't referring specifically to Buddha, we still must acknowledge that fact that God sent prophets and messengers to EVERY nation (or community of people), and this includes now-idolized righteous teachers, such as Buddha, Khrisha, and Jesus, who all preached a message of peace and submission. Personally, I think "Dhul-Kifl" (or "Zul-Kifl") may be referring to Buddha; but even if it isn't, it doesn't change this concept at all, since he can still be viewed as a messenger of God, who's message to his people was amazingly similar to the messages of the prophets Jesus and Muhammad.
"The true delight is in the finding out, rather than in the knowing." - Isaac Asimov